Simpson & Brown Architects with Addyman Archaeology

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Lawhead Steading

Lawhead Steading

Lawhead Steading

Lawhead Steading

Lawhead Steading

Lawhead Steading

Lawhead Steading

Lawhead Steading

Lawhead Steading

Lawhead Steading

Lawhead Steading

Lawhead Steading

Lawhead Steading was formerly part of the Tyninghame Estate in East Lothian.  When Tighmor, a development company specialising in rural homes, purchased the site, Simpson & Brown were asked to produce a scheme to convert the now redundant steading to residential use.

We began our task by carrying out a comprehensive building survey combined with historical research to establish the extent and the sequence of the buildings.   Lawhead, like most similar steadings, dates mainly from the mid-nineteenth century when an intensive wave of farm improvements spread throughout Scotland.  This was encouraged by the publication of popular books on the subject such as J.C. Loudon’s ‘Encyclopaedia of Cottage, Farm and Villa Architecture and Furniture, (1833).

Having established the age and significance of the various elements, we then devised a strategy to optimise the preservation of the original fabric.  Later agricultural sheds were taken down and this large steading was given back its courtyard.  This space features a new car port with an open roof structure based upon a design used for cattle pens on the site.  The original stone built ranges with their pantiled roofs were subdivided to create eight bespoke houses, each with its own unique character.

 

 

Project name: Lawhead Steading