Simpson & Brown Architects with Addyman Archaeology

Menu
Inchconnachan Lodge

Inchconnachan Lodge

Inchconnachan Lodge

Inchconnachan Lodge

Inchconnachan Lodge

Inchconnachan Lodge

Inchconnachan Island (Innis Chonachain in Gaelic) is a small Island in Loch Lomond, privately owned by the Luss Estates, which derives its name from the Colquhoun family. In 2012 Simpson & Brown achieved planning permission for a new house replacing a derelict a wooden lodge and associated outbuildings erected in the 1920’s by Admiral Sullivan.  It was the holiday home of Lady Arran Colquhoun, sister of Sir Ivor Colquhoun and well known Scottish powerboating racer. Now uninhabited the island is best known for its colony of wallabies in traduced by Lady Colquhoun in the 1940s.

The design ethos not only aims to reflect local and vernacular culture and tradition but also to demonstrate an understanding of contemporary life in rural Scotland.  Adopting a strong Y-shaped plan with a south-westerly axis, the proposed lodge consists of two ranges of sleeping accommodation set either side of a central linear range which comprises the main living and warden’s accommodation.

The palette of materials has been kept simple in order to compliment the forms of the building and the ambience of the site, taking precedence from the existing lodge.  Wide rough-sawn timber cladding emphasizes the horizontality of the general massing whilst grounding the building in its woodland setting. The roofs will be clad in corrugate ‘wrinkly tin’. Chunky timber posts and beam sections will frame the corners and larger openings and create a stopping point to the elevations. Through the use of wrinkly tin and the colour of the timber cladding and joinery finishes, the new lodge seeks to exploit the ever-changing colours and textures of the wooded site, and to root itself subtly into its unique setting.

Project name: Inchconnachan Lodge
Client name: Luss Estates
View Map →